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Poll: Personal-, state-budget angst roils CT residents

BY Gregory Seay

10/23/2017
Connecticut residents are fearful about the state's budget woes and are open to tolls and legalized marijuana to generate revenue. But many also are worried enough about their own personal finances to consider moving out, a new poll finds.

One in three residents (30.3 percent) surveyed in early October by Sacred Heart University's Institute for Public Policy believes Connecticut's overall quality of life is "declining.''

Three in four (76.4 percent) of the 1,000 state residents polled agree the state should offer more tax credits and rebates and other incentives to retain and attract businesses.

Most (84.4 percent) believe that towns should merge and consolidate public services to help cut costs.
Also, more than three out of five respondents are finding it "very" or "somewhat difficult" to maintain their standard of living. Nearly half of respondents making more than $150,000 per year reported they are considering moving out of Connecticut within the next five years.

Connecticut lawmakers have yet to send a compromise biennial budget to the governor.

The state is at a critical crossroads, and it appears obvious from the results of this survey that residents are experiencing a high degree of anxiety over the state's budget battles, taxes and the cost of living in Connecticut," said Lesley A. DeNardis, director of the SHU Institute for Public Policy.

Other poll findings include:

  • A broad swath of resident, regardless of income and education, agree that "creating new sources of tax revenue" is the preferred method of addressing the state's budget woes, rather than cutting funding to programs and services or raising existing taxes
  • The areas of greatest concern among residents are the "high overall cost of living" and "high overall tax burden" in Connecticut.
  • SHU's Institute for Public Policy partnered with GreatBlue Research Inc. in poll, which has an error rate of plus or minus 3 percent. Their next poll is slated for December.